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Old 03-18-2013, 12:38 PM   #16
valee
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I never realized that there wasn't a minimum age for entry, and think it's entirely appropriate. I know it will be embarrassing for those over 14 who are questioned about their age, but think that's outwieghed by the benefits of increased supervision.
I'm always amazed that parents who say "but my kids..." don't realize that when they're not around, their kids may be "the worst kids you've encountered from another family." I've seen the difference in kids' behavior between when their parents are around, and when they aren't, and it's not always pretty.
Of course, I can anticipate that there will be kids hanging around outside the gates and slipstreaming in with a large group.
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Old 03-18-2013, 12:45 PM   #17
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Originally Posted by Spacedog1975 View Post
I think it is perfectly reasonable and well within their right. No matter how well behaved your kids are with you, that is not necessarily a reflection of how they will be on their own. Disney cannot be responsible for the liability of non adults running around the park. Further, it would potentially disturb other guests.

When people bristle at these rules, their immediate thought goes to "but my kids..." If that's too difficult for you to wrap your brain around, spend another moment thinking about the worst kids you've encountered from another family. If that doesn't work, just think of it this way - Disney wants your kids to have a safe experience, and they know that the best people to assure that are their parents.
I agree with you; however I do think tickets should be priced based on these rules. If someone is old enough to need an adult ticket, then they are old enough to be treated as an adult. I don't think Disney gets to say 9 and older need an adult ticket, but you have to be 14 before we treat you like an adult. All that I am saying is that there needs to be consistency between the policies.
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Old 03-18-2013, 01:08 PM   #18
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Originally Posted by cmwade77 View Post
I agree with you; however I do think tickets should be priced based on these rules. If someone is old enough to need an adult ticket, then they are old enough to be treated as an adult. I don't think Disney gets to say 9 and older need an adult ticket, but you have to be 14 before we treat you like an adult. All that I am saying is that there needs to be consistency between the policies.
Do you still think people who don't like this policy have grounds to sue? By that I mean have a reasonable expectation of winning?

Apples and oranges. You can vote at age 18 but you can't drink until you're 21. You need to be 21 to book a room in Las Vegas but hotels in Las Vegas generally count every person in the room, including infants, when computing room rate.

Disney doesn't even have to offer a lower admission price for kids. The age in which Disney no longer offers a discount has nothing to do with the minimum age for admission without an adult.

Some dinner shows include adult beverages. Frequently they'll charge the adult price for people over the age for kids pricing which is less then 21.

edited to add--Some water parks offer discounted admission based on the height, not age, of the customers. Tall enough to ride most of the thrill attractions and you'll pay the adult price. That sounds fair to me. I don't know why being allowed to enter the park without an adult should have anything to do with what you pay.

Last edited by Lewisc; 03-18-2013 at 01:17 PM.
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Old 03-18-2013, 01:27 PM   #19
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Disney's park, their property, their rules. Like it or not they're not breaking any laws, no one is being descriminated nor wronged. What are the damges?
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Old 03-18-2013, 02:05 PM   #20
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Do you still think people who don't like this policy have grounds to sue? By that I mean have a reasonable expectation of winning?

Apples and oranges. You can vote at age 18 but you can't drink until you're 21. You need to be 21 to book a room in Las Vegas but hotels in Las Vegas generally count every person in the room, including infants, when computing room rate.

Disney doesn't even have to offer a lower admission price for kids. The age in which Disney no longer offers a discount has nothing to do with the minimum age for admission without an adult.

Some dinner shows include adult beverages. Frequently they'll charge the adult price for people over the age for kids pricing which is less then 21.

edited to add--Some water parks offer discounted admission based on the height, not age, of the customers. Tall enough to ride most of the thrill attractions and you'll pay the adult price. That sounds fair to me. I don't know why being allowed to enter the park without an adult should have anything to do with what you pay.
I think that someone would have a slim chance of winning. I never said I thought they would win against Disney. I did say that Disney would most likely be footing the bill for their defense, as I could see it not being considered a frivolous lawsuit. This costs money, which then in turn costs us more money in higher prices.

I can also see situations that will need to be accommodated, such as a 10 year old who came with Mom. Mom gets hurt in the park somehow. There is a locker rented outside the park and the kid needs to get something out of it (perhaps something medically necessary an they didn't know First Aid would hold it for them) and bring it to Mom. If this isn't accommodated, then I think that the lawsuit would be successful.

As for other parks using heights, their policy is usually to allow anyone over the required height to enter without anyone older/taller.
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Old 03-18-2013, 02:14 PM   #21
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cmwade77 View Post
I agree with you; however I do think tickets should be priced based on these rules. If someone is old enough to need an adult ticket, then they are old enough to be treated as an adult. I don't think Disney gets to say 9 and older need an adult ticket, but you have to be 14 before we treat you like an adult. All that I am saying is that there needs to be consistency between the policies.
So, if Disney were to charge the same for all tickets, adult and child like they do with an AP, you'd be OK with it, as long as the actual ticket had Child/Junior printed on it for anyone under 14? Or if they simply didn't designate whether a ticket was child or adult, just a ticket?

Just asking, since that seems like a really easy way to address those that say that kids 10+ pay the same as a 14 yo, just charge the same but call the ticket a different name.
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Old 03-19-2013, 01:37 PM   #22
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I think we're missing one of the bigger points that will make this policy difficult for Disney. Having a random CM verbally determine if a child is 14 is near impossible.

Here's the scenario. A child, who is 14, goes to a Disney park. The CM at the gate stops him/her for being too young, then contacts said parent. Said parent insists they are 14, but Disney disagrees and denies entry.

While I don't believe the scenario is illegal, it screams a PR nightmare for Disney.
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Old 03-19-2013, 02:01 PM   #23
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Here's the scenario. A child, who is 14, goes to a Disney park. The CM at the gate stops him/her for being too young, then contacts said parent. Said parent insists they are 14, but Disney disagrees and denies entry.
Under those conditions, why would Disney deny entry?

If they child can quickly answer questions like their Date of Birth and current grade level in school, the screening will probably not go any further than that. If a parent is contacted and confirms the age, the encounter will definitely be over.

The only time Disney would press it further is if there is some behavioral issue which violates park policy. If a 14 year old is guilty of improper dress, language or overall park behavior, he/she will be asked to leave for that reason.

This policy change is little more than a deterrent. By publicizing the age 14 minimum, 95% of those under age will willingly comply. Or rather, their parents will.

Some will still try to cheat the system. Some will succeed.

And Disney will probably turn-away some children who are under the age limit. But I can't see it turning into a PR nightmare. A parent who knowingly violates park rules--AND thinks it's appropriate to send a 12/13 year old to a theme park unsupervised--isn't going to garner a lot of public sympathy.
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Old 03-19-2013, 03:52 PM   #24
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we have aps my DD is 13 and 8 mos. she and her BFF who is 13 also walk around alone all the time.. They know the parks and what to do in a Emergency I am always in the same park as them but often watching shows or riding rides! I think Disney is just enforcing the already in place rule that kids need someone 14 older to escort younger kids on ride! Not to ride alone themselves I believe the current alone age to ride is 8?? anyway under 14 is kinda young to be arriving and leaving such a busy place alone in my opion!
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Old 03-20-2013, 06:56 PM   #25
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I personally think that the policy should be based on the age that adult tickets are required. Bottom line is if someone has to pay the adult price, they should be treated as an adult.
I am 100% in agreement with this. If 11-13 cannot be allowed in as adults, then they shouldn't be charged like adults. Bring back the Junior ticket. Any behavioral/safety issues out there are not addressed by a policy that simply requires an adult to enter the gate (who then could leave and never return). The only thing this policy can realistically accomplish is padding revenues by making it twice as expensive for someone that age to enter the park.
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Old 03-21-2013, 01:02 PM   #26
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I think it's a great idea to make the parent accompany the under 14 crowd into Disney! What happens if a child is injured at Disney and the parent is not at the park (work, shopping, etc)? Who is liable? What if the parent claims that they did not give the child permission to go to the park? What if the child needs to be removed from that park and the parent is nowhere to be found? Better for Disney to err on the side of caution.

As for asking the child's age, I always make my nieces get a state ID before flying. What's wrong with them carrying their ID in the park? ID in case of emergency. ID if they have to cash traveler's checks. You never know what can happen.
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Old 03-21-2013, 07:38 PM   #27
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Require the parent buy the ticket and declare the age. If something happens to the child and there is no parent then that should relieve Disney of responsibility.

Let's start cranking in more parental responsibility.
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Old 03-21-2013, 08:07 PM   #28
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Require the parent buy the ticket and declare the age. If something happens to the child and there is no parent then that should relieve Disney of responsibility.

Let's start cranking in more parental responsibility.
There is already a waiver of general liability attached to the use of the ticket. Only through negligence by Disney as a company do they become liable, and that would have to be proven in court. That would still be true regardless of the age of the ticket user and whether or not anyone of the required age entered the park with them.

All this policy does is require an adult enter the park with them. It doesn't require them to stay.
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Old 03-22-2013, 07:33 AM   #29
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I can see this working with the new Magic Bands. Make kids 14 and older purchase 'adult' tickets, and keep the DOB/age info stored on the RFID bands so that when a child under the age of 14 scans for entry, the CM at the turnstile is reminded to make sure that someone of adult age is accompanying.

I don't think I could have handled being alone in Disney at 14. Obviously, some children are different and Disney has to set a reasonable standard. I'd rather see kids unaccompanied in a place like Disney than in the middle of a large city.
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Old 03-22-2013, 12:32 PM   #30
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I don't think I could have handled being alone in Disney at 14. Obviously, some children are different and Disney has to set a reasonable standard. I'd rather see kids unaccompanied in a place like Disney than in the middle of a large city.
I agree with you. What I will say is that it isn't unusual for us to send a child through the queue with another parent already inside the park waiting, or for us to enter in separate lines. My son knows what to do, and is about the same height and size as me anyway (at the age of 12), so we don't always enter in the same queue (but we do enter together, as in he is never in the park for more than a minute or so without one of his parents).
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