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Old 03-24-2012, 10:29 PM   #1
imktdqt810
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growth hormone deficiency in children

Hello,

I was wondering if anyone on the boards have a child (or children) diagnosed with this? My DS, age 7, has been after going through a 6 1/2 hr Stim test, bloodwork, bone study and MRI. He will be on trev-tropin <sp?> and we are awaiting the arrival of it next week. They send out a nurse to the house to train us on the injections. He is deathly afraid of needles so we requested to be trained on the needle and the T-Jet. The Endo's office actually gave me the riot act for wanting to even TRY the T-Jet saying it caused bruising and was very painful (like a rubber band snapping). Maybe I'm just more nervous then he is!! DH will have to do the injections since I pass out at the site of a needle.
Has anyone travelled with the meds and syringes? We will be heading to WDW in Sept..I've never flown with meds like these before. Any heads up as to what to expect on all of this would be great!! Thank you!!
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Old 03-25-2012, 12:34 PM   #2
utterrandomness
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I used the t-jet (or something similar, but less fancy, more like a container for the needle with a button to do the actual injection) when I was taking Saizen for Growth Hormone Deficiency when I was young. There was some bruising, but it made life so much easier. I was on Saizen from when I was 10 until I was 15, and not using plain needles allowed me to do it myself when I got a little older, allowing me to go for sleepovers and away on trips without my parents. Having that independence meant a lot to me as I got older. Don't let the doctor talk you out of what you think is best for your child, you get to make the decisions about trade-offs like that.

As for flying with meds and syringes etc., get a doctors note so you can take the needles on the plane with you. I had a special cooler-bag for transporting the medication (it needed to be refrigerated)with pockets for the needles, alcohol swabs and all the other equipment. One tip that I have for you would be to bring a roll of paper towel in a ziplock bag so you always have something clean to dry your hands on before giving the injection.

I just looked up the T-Jet, and to me, it looks like the increased ease, even from what I had, would be worth a little extra bruising. But talk about it with your child and let him be part of the conversation, it will make your life easier. His word doesn't have to be the last word, but it should be considered.
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Old 03-25-2012, 12:37 PM   #3
utterrandomness
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If you really don't want to use the T-Jet, the equipment I used was called inject-ease, and you never see the needle, which helps with the fear. http://www.palcolabs.com/section_pro...njectease.html

I also felt that time helped with the fear of needles.
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Old 03-25-2012, 12:44 PM   #4
imktdqt810
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Thank you for your reply. I did get a backpack filled with stuff that had like a fanny pak with a place for an ice pack and all the fun stuff!! Didn't think of the Dr's note for the trip..DUh..goes to show I'm over thinking everything.
We also got a "cover" in that backpack that you put the needle in. I had him watch the short 5 min DVD that came with it so he was aware of what is due to take place. He saw the 'Shot" and freaked out. We are calling them "Injections" and he's been more comfortable talking about it. So we shall see how it goes once we get everything here and we can see for ourselves how big (or small) the needles are. Have a great weekend!!
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Old 03-25-2012, 12:58 PM   #5
utterrandomness
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The needles are tiny, nothing like a flu shot or any other immunization, more like what's used for insulin. If you have any other questions, you're welcome to message me here.
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Old 03-25-2012, 02:45 PM   #6
mackay_j
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Cant help about air shots but wanted to add this:-

Try be very possitive about the shots to your son, do not let him get any idea of your apprehensions. We just told our dd how lucky she was to have this to fix her and talked about other children who would do anything to have an injection for that.

It may be best for you to do the shots first befor your DH, as if he starts you may never get round to doing it as your not happy to. But what would then happen if your husband had to go away/ go into hospital . We were in the same boat, my DH hates needles but I am so glad he did the injections first as later in the year I had to go into hos and aT least I knew he would manage.

I wouldn't worry too much about using the air shots, children very quickly adapt to injections and by 71/2 my dd was doing her own (not growth - insulin) 3 times a day and at lunch without us to supervise her).


Good luck
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Old 04-12-2012, 09:27 PM   #7
momto2js
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I started having multiple injections a day at age 7. A nurse in the hospital when I was diagnosed with diabetes, looked at me and said, you have to do this, get over it. I have used all kinds of spring loaded devices and I'll be honest, the old fashoned syringe hurts the least. He likely won't feel a thing once he gets over the panic.

To be completly honest, I would ask the doc for a saline RX and practice on yourself. Tell you son that you don't like needles eithor but see it isn't that bad. You are an adult and parent, you really have to get over the needle thing. He doesn't have an option and neithor do you. You will need to do be able to do the injections too in case your DH is not available. I know it sounds harsh, but it really is true. This comes for the kids that needed shots and a parent that has a kid that has lots of meds he doesn't want to take.

Traveling with meds is no big deal. The TSA won't blink an eye, take the Rx label with you if I will make you feel better.
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