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Old 09-01-2013, 06:53 PM   #16
SmallWorld71
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Originally Posted by Nixie View Post
Thank you for this. This really helps. I guess I am asking too much of our school? The principal told me he wouldn't even qualify for a 504 because he isn't struggling academically. I am not expecting him to be put into different classes or anything. I totally don't think he needs that. What he does need is a little more emotional support during school. When something "goes wrong" for him, he shuts down. That can turn into anything from him literally acting out in school by yelling or screaming to hiding under a desk, to running outta of classroom, or like last year, physically threatening a teacher. That is what I was hoping they would help me on so it doesn't get to that point for him. I want him to have an avenue open that if he is feeling like he is getting to that point, he can talk to someone (eventhough he won't want to. they will have to prod and encourage him to explore what is going on). This is what we do at home. I guess this is beyond what should be expected for a school to be able to do for him. They seem to be more focused on the academic part than the actual social/emotional part which is what he is having the biggest problem with. I am looking into some social groups and such in our area that he can attend after school, so we can start helping him learn to identify and manage his emotions and what is considered socially acceptable behavior.
FWIW - I don't think you are asking for anything unreasonable and I feel that meeting children's emotional needs is something that even the best schools struggle with.
Hopefully, the school will find a way to work with you to meet your son's needs whatever the avenue may be.
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Old 09-17-2013, 01:44 PM   #17
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Hi Nixie, my son (nearly 8) was just diagnosed (last month) with autism using both the DSM IV and DSM V guidelines. He is considered high functioning and under the older method of diagnosing I believe that would be Asperger's but as of now they are just calling his diagnosis ASD but they use the term "high functioning" which I believe are pretty interchangeable. He already had an IEP in place so I can't totally relate to your concerns, but when I made changes to his existing IEP we met with the district psychologist and a resource teacher who started a "60 day timeline" which means they have to evaluate him, and between their findings and the evaluation by the facility who diagnosed his ASD they will determine what extra things the school can do for him and must schedule the followup meeting within that 60 day period. I can't imagine why someone would think your son would not qualify for an IEP without doing the work to evaluate and observe him first. I hope that you can get that situation resolved soon. I'd keep pushing for it, going up the chain until the school district if I had to. My son also has ADHD and is very bright but I do believe he needs the social skills as well as emotional support (for anxiety and the meltdowns when he can't effectively communicate with his teachers/peers) so I am hoping this IEP will continue to make our lives better.

I wish you the best with your challenges, it sounds like your son is in very good hands with a parent who is so passionate about his well being
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Old 09-20-2013, 08:39 PM   #18
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He qualifies for the 504 plan. DS had one(now has an IEP) based on him having ADHD. You said your DS forgot his books. One of the provisions in my DS's plan is that he has an extra set books to keep at home. Help with organizational issues, prompts from teachers and several other things. Do research on the internet and read all of the books you can from the library. Google 504 and IEPs there is lots of information. As another poster suggested Wrights Law has lots of good information.
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Old 10-08-2013, 01:36 PM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nixie View Post
Thank you for this. This really helps. I guess I am asking too much of our school? The principal told me he wouldn't even qualify for a 504 because he isn't struggling academically. I am not expecting him to be put into different classes or anything. I totally don't think he needs that. What he does need is a little more emotional support during school. When something "goes wrong" for him, he shuts down. That can turn into anything from him literally acting out in school by yelling or screaming to hiding under a desk, to running outta of classroom, or like last year, physically threatening a teacher. That is what I was hoping they would help me on so it doesn't get to that point for him. I want him to have an avenue open that if he is feeling like he is getting to that point, he can talk to someone (eventhough he won't want to. they will have to prod and encourage him to explore what is going on). This is what we do at home. I guess this is beyond what should be expected for a school to be able to do for him. They seem to be more focused on the academic part than the actual social/emotional part which is what he is having the biggest problem with. I am looking into some social groups and such in our area that he can attend after school, so we can start helping him learn to identify and manage his emotions and what is considered socially acceptable behavior.
I live in another country and Early Education Intervention is a big thing here but only started recently. My son is very intelligent but had behavioral problems so he had Speech Therapy, Educational Psychologist, and an ABA Therapist. The ABA Therapist trained me as well as an Intern to assist my son. My son improved dramatically and there has been very few incidents since. He tends to run away now rather than hit people. He has a lot of Sensory issues as well. His diagnose is Aspergers. He had an IEP. We are having some issues again but now he doesn't want to do his work so we will be having a meeting soon with the Educational Psychologist and his Teacher. So my short version in what little I know is that your child should have one and you will have to be the advocate for your child. Don't give up as everything you are saying is the same problems that I had. I don't know what a 504 though. Good luck.
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Old 10-18-2013, 07:23 AM   #20
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Hi,

I would like to say that my 12 year old daughter was diagnosed when she was 7. However, we knew from less than a year she was on the spectrum.

My daughter was diagnosed with Asperger's instead of high functioning Autism. When I asked why to the specialists and speech language patholigist she gave me an answer. Besides the delay in the language aspect of autism, there is social behavior that classifies them differently.

If a child seeks out other children and wants to engage but doesn't know how then it is Asperger's. If the child is more introvert and doesn't show interest in relationships then it is more high functioning Autism. It really doesn't matter which one is the diagnosis, but it is nice to know.

As far as an IEP. My daughter was on one til 4th grade when they dismissed her from speech therapy. She is academically advanced but of course lacks the social/emotional needs. She was placed on a 504 for social and emotional support as well as no time testing.

The 504 is a little weaker in the schools however, I have a good school system who doesn't care about the document. They follow the recommendations for support and it works.

Good luck on your journey.
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Old 10-18-2013, 08:16 AM   #21
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Not to replace anything else you do, but have you contacted the school counselor?
I know in my daughter's school if we contact the counselor we can request they reach out to the child. In addition to it potentially starting a relationship there, it is possible that if the counselor recognizes an issue that could help you get an emotional/behavioral plan in place.
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Old 02-15-2014, 02:59 AM   #22
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One problem that contributes to differing diagnoses is that not all doctors are qualified to make a diagnosis of an Autism spectrum disorder. The best way to obtain an accurate diagnosis is to have a transdisciplinary evaluation.

A transdisciplinary evaluation not only provides an accurate diagnosis but it also is the best way to obtain recommendations for therapeutic and educational programming. Unfortunately, these evaluations are very expensive and often not covered by insurance.
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Old 02-15-2014, 04:25 AM   #23
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I have another question: I have already been told by the school, that we will have problems getting an IEP for him because academically he is doing just fine. He has to be having problems academically to be approved for services. I think this is being a little short sighted. My child isn't having problems academically (because he is ridiculously bright), but he is having problems with the social aspects of school. His behavior has caused problems in school like getting suspended for two days last year. He only does what is asked of him; bare minimum. He probably would get better grades and such if he were to actually apply himself which he doesn't do because of attention issues. SO, because he isn't having actual academic problems, he won't get services like being able to get a "time out" when he is being overwhelmed. They will treat hs outbursts like a behavioral problem and not a symptom of some other issues that are going on. Does that make sense? How do I go about dealing with this and getting the services I think he needs like being able to talk to a counsler at school if he is having a rough day or quiet, less stimulating places for test taking and studying, etc. ??
My son was diagnosed with autism when he was 3. He is now 7 and is extremely smart. He's reading on a 3rd and 4th grade level. He quizzes himself in definitions of words and different ways to spell them (ie steak and stake) he also taught himself multiplication and division. He does have behavior issues though. If he gets bored in school he will keep himself busy making things up to do or making sounds. He also sometimes talks back to his teacher if he doesn't like what she's teaching bc in his mind if he already knows what she's teaching y should he have to listen to her. It's also very hard to keep up with his need for learning. He learns things very quickly and wants to learn different things and he doesn't understand y some other kids take longer at learning things. Anyways to get to my point...academically he's a super star but behavior wise he can be difficult at times. He does have an IEP and he also has a 504 in place both for behavior. If I were u I would contact your districts child study team. They might want to test him themselves though. I don't know how it is with older kids. My district tested my son when he was 4. He also has ADHD as well. His attention is just not there, so the 504 is geared more to ADHD and the IEP more for the asd. Anyways good luck and I hope they grant u the IEP.
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Old 02-15-2014, 07:38 AM   #24
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bocaj1431 View Post
One problem that contributes to differing diagnoses is that not all doctors are qualified to make a diagnosis of an Autism spectrum disorder. The best way to obtain an accurate diagnosis is to have a transdisciplinary evaluation.

A transdisciplinary evaluation not only provides an accurate diagnosis but it also is the best way to obtain recommendations for therapeutic and educational programming. Unfortunately, these evaluations are very expensive and often not covered by insurance.
I was just going to ask the OP what testing the doctors/councilor/psychologist have done to get the diagnosis? There are so many doctors out there who just watch a kid for 10 minutes and slap on a diagnosis. A school system may not even take a diagnosis without testing results.
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Old 02-21-2014, 11:29 PM   #25
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The biggest difference between high functioning Autism and aspergers is COMMUNICATION people don't agree, but guess what I have 2 girls on the spectrum I live it daily
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Old 02-21-2014, 11:31 PM   #26
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My understanding is that the only difference is when language skills developed. Kids who had normal language development are diagnosed Asperger's, while language delays signal an Autism diagnosis. I'm pretty much with pp though, no real difference between the two.
didnt read your responses before I replied sorry but that is a bigger difference the. People think
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Old 02-21-2014, 11:33 PM   #27
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Originally Posted by Nixie View Post
I have another question: I have already been told by the school, that we will have problems getting an IEP for him because academically he is doing just fine. He has to be having problems academically to be approved for services. I think this is being a little short sighted. My child isn't having problems academically (because he is ridiculously bright), but he is having problems with the social aspects of school. His behavior has caused problems in school like getting suspended for two days last year. He only does what is asked of him; bare minimum. He probably would get better grades and such if he were to actually apply himself which he doesn't do because of attention issues. SO, because he isn't having actual academic problems, he won't get services like being able to get a "time out" when he is being overwhelmed. They will treat hs outbursts like a behavioral problem and not a symptom of some other issues that are going on. Does that make sense? How do I go about dealing with this and getting the services I think he needs like being able to talk to a counsler at school if he is having a rough day or quiet, less stimulating places for test taking and studying, etc. ??
if your child has a diagnosis he automatically gets an IEPER
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Old 02-21-2014, 11:37 PM   #28
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Originally Posted by mommamonster View Post
Hi Nixie, my son (nearly 8) was just diagnosed (last month) with autism using both the DSM IV and DSM V guidelines. He is considered high functioning and under the older method of diagnosing I believe that would be Asperger's but as of now they are just calling his diagnosis ASD but they use the term "high functioning" which I believe are pretty interchangeable. He already had an IEP in place so I can't totally relate to your concerns, but when I made changes to his existing IEP we met with the district psychologist and a resource teacher who started a "60 day timeline" which means they have to evaluate him, and between their findings and the evaluation by the facility who diagnosed his ASD they will determine what extra things the school can do for him and must schedule the followup meeting within that 60 day period. I can't imagine why someone would think your son would not qualify for an IEP without doing the work to evaluate and observe him first. I hope that you can get that situation resolved soon. I'd keep pushing for it, going up the chain until the school district if I had to. My son also has ADHD and is very bright but I do believe he needs the social skills as well as emotional support (for anxiety and the meltdowns when he can't effectively communicate with his teachers/peers) so I am hoping this IEP will continue to make our lives better. I wish you the best with your challenges, it sounds like your son is in very good hands with a parent who is so passionate about his well being
please embrace the ASD aspergers now isn't going exists
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Old 02-22-2014, 12:04 AM   #29
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What is really scary and I totally get parents wanting the Aspergers diagnosis , it was the best thing you could have asked for if you had to have an ASD diagnosis now hindsight is as they say is 20/20 I have 2 DD totally different ends of the spectrum it's not easy it never will be parents have to now decide whether begging for that Aspergers diagnosis was worth it because it just doesn't have any affect anymore
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Old 02-22-2014, 12:24 AM   #30
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Aspergers as a diagnosis has now been wiped out it does t exist
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